Youths take lead in anti-violence campaign

paul

QUEENSLAND Youth will take a greater role in 2010’s One Punch Can Kill program, with a chance to spread the non-violence message to their peers and help design the campaign.

In a competition held by state police and supported by the Matthew Stanley Foundation and Queensland Homicide Victims Support Group, young adults can submit sound clips, artworks or movies showing where the campaign should go.

Matthew Stanley Foundation director Paul Stanley of Alexandra Hills said adults might not understand the concepts introduced through the competition, meaning a generation gap needs bridging.

“Its a brave but strong concept that breaks the thinking that advertising campaigns are only made by advertising teams,’’ Mr Stanley said.  “With a program made by young people for young people, those like me will say we don’t like it but then again we don’t understand what goes through the mind of a 16 or 17-year-old. If we find it a bit weird, it might be the concept that truly works.’’

The competition idea was born from the campaign’s early days when younger Queenslanders considered the frowning-face logo too neat and created their own edgier design.

The Matthew Stanley Foundation was founded in 2006 after Paul’s son died following an assault.
Police Minister Neil Roberts hopes the competition will encourage youths to take an active role.
“We’re asking them how anti-violence messages should be conveyed to their own generation. They need to see that the consequences of violent behaviour are simply not worth the risk.’’
More info at the website onepunchcankill.qld.gov.au.

Qld Police – One Punch Can Kill

The One Punch Can Kill campaign is aimed at preventing senseless violence among young people, and about stopping them from making split-second decisions that could ruin their lives or the lives of others.

It targets ‘Generation Y’ using modern media and technology, and informs today’s youth that acts of violence can have very serious and damaging consequences.

Research shows young men between the age of 15 and 25 are the most likely to be assault victims or offenders.

One Punch Can Kill is the result of recommendations from the Government’s Youth Violence Task Force, which called for a targeted media strategy to send home the message of anti-violence.

The slogan ‘One Punch Can Kill’ is a reminder of the shocking reality that simple acts of violence can have tragic consequences.

The message is that violence can result in:

Death
Imprisonment
A permanent criminal record
Bans on obtaining a passport and travelling overseas
Emotional trauma for family and friends of the victim and offender.
It is hoped by outlining these harsh realities for young people that they will reconsider their behaviour and choose to live a life without violence.

One Punch Can Kill focuses on a positive message of choosing options, and empowers young people to consider the consequences of their decisions, such as whether to fight or walk away.

Research has found that young males are highly influenced by the women who surround them such as friends, girlfriends, housemates, siblings and mums. The slogan “I support Blokes who don’t fight” has been created in the hope that girls and women will get on board to influence young men not to respond violently in heated situations and to emphasise the fact that is it ok to walk away.

The “One Punch Can Kill” message goes hand in hand with the Party Safe Program.

All Queenslanders are encouraged to get behind the message, and to register parties with police.

Premier Anna Bligh, Commissioner Bob Atkinson, Paul Stanley of the Matthew Stanley Foundation, and the Queensland Homicide Victims’ Support Group are among many key supporters who encourage the community to get behind the campaign to stop the violence that is ruining young lives.

Information regarding the campaign is available on the internet through MySpace, Facebook, Yahoo and Hotmail. There are also radio ads and convenience advertising in pubs and clubs and other public places.

All young people deserve to have a good start in life, and acts of violence can damage both victims’ and offenders’ chances of a positive future. One Punch Can Kill focuses on changing the attitudes of those people who are involved in violence in the hope that it will become a universal view that violence is not ok.

One Punch Can Kill

One punch can kill, youth told
2:51p.m. 6 February 2008
By Mark Furler

Police Minister Judy Spence today launched the second phase of the One Punch Can Kill campaign which aims to teach young people the consequences of violence.

Phase two features a dedicated website, interactive game, videos, bus advertising and a large inflatable display to be used at events such as music festivals.

“As Chair of the Government’s Youth Violence Task Force, it became clear that many young men have no idea that a split second decision to engage in violence can destroy lives,” Ms Spence said.

“They just don’t realise they can kill someone or be killed themselves – devastating family and friends.

“Even if the violence doesn’t end in death they can end up with a criminal record, spend time in jail, pay big fines, and lose employment prospects or the chance to travel overseas,” Ms Spence said.

A key recommendation from the Youth Violence Task Force was to undertake an education campaign, aimed at Generation Y, about the consequences of violence.

This campaign has been specifically designed to reach Generation Y and includes the use of the internet and new media.

The first phase, launched in December, included radio ads, convenience advertising in pubs and clubs, and internet sites such as MySpace, Facebook, Yahoo and Hotmail.

“Our internet banner ad has already appeared more than two million times on Facebook and one million times on MySpace.

“Already, just through word of mouth, almost 500 people have joined the One Punch Can Kill Group on Facebook.

“Phase two of the campaign involves taking the online education to a new level with a dedicated One Punch Can Kill website which includes an online interactive game. The concept of the game is for young men to reach their girl without getting into a fight or drinking too much.

“The website will also stream two videos which show what could happen if a young man fights and what could happen if he walks away. Gen Y does not respond well to being told what to do. This approach gives the information and allows young people to make their own mind up.

“These videos will also be available to television stations as community service announcements.

“An 11 metre by 7 metre outdoor inflatable display has also been developed to be used at events that appeal to Gen Y such as music festivals and rural shows. One Punch Can Kill promotional materials such as button badges and wrist bands will be handed out to people who visit the display.

“There will also be advertising, on the backs of buses and in bus interiors, featuring prominent young women and the slogan ‘I support blokes who don’t fight’. This is based on research that shows young males are particularly influenced by the women in their lives such as friends, girlfriends, housemates, siblings and Mums.

Ms Spence thanked the Matthew Stanley Foundation and the Queensland Homicide Victims’ Support Group for their ongoing efforts to raise community awareness of this issue.

Acting Deputy Commissioner Kathy Rynders said: “The One Punch Can Kill message will also go hand in hand with the Party Safe message. I encourage all people who are hosting parties to register them with police.

“All Queenslanders, particularly young men in the 15-25 age group need to realise the potential consequence of violence, particularly when alcohol is involved.

“It’s ok to walk away from a confrontation.

“Time and time again police see the results of one moment of madness – one punch which leads to devastating consequences.

“This is not for shock value – one punch really can kill,” Ms Rynders said.

PREMIER DELIVERS ONE PUNCH CAN KILL CAMPAIGN

Premier Anna Bligh today launched the “One Punch Can Kill” campaign, aimed at preventing senseless violence among young people.

Ms Bligh said the innovative campaign targeting ‘Generation Y’ using new media and technology, sends the message to today’s youth that acts of violence can have very serious and damaging effects.

The campaign is the result of recommendations from the Government’s Youth Violence Task Force, which called for a targeted media strategy, to send home the message of anti-violence.

“This campaign is about stopping young people from making split-second decisions which could ruin their lives, or the lives of others,” Ms Bligh said.
“Research shows young men in particular, between the age of 15 and 25, are the most likely to be assault victims or offenders.
“The slogan ‘One punch can kill’ is a reminder of the shocking reality, that simple acts of violence can have tragic consequences.
“Many young people just don’t realise what these consequences are, so the campaign outlines the facts for young people to understand.”
The message is violence can result in:
· Bans on obtaining a passport and travelling overseas

· A permanent criminal record

· Imprisonment

· Death

· Emotional trauma for family and friends of victim and offender

“By outlining these harsh realities for young people, we hope they will reconsider their behaviour and chose to live a life without violence,” Ms Bligh said.

Police Minister Judy Spence said the campaign will involve education via the internet, through MySpace, Facebook, Yahoo and Hotmail. There are also Radio ads and convenience advertising in pubs and clubs.

“We want to engage these young people in an arena that is relevant to them,” Ms Spence said.

“Online concepts will include flash banners featuring the campaign’s own emoticon, to deliver the key message that “one punch can kill”.

“The campaign focuses on a positive message of choosing options, empowering young people to consider the consequences of their decisions, such as whether to fight or walk away.

“By promoting the fact that it is ok to walk away and look after your mates, we hope to change the attitude of some of today’s youth.

“Our research has found, young males are highly influenced by the women who surround them such as friends, girlfriends, housemates, siblings and mums.

“So we’re also promoting the slogan “I support Blokes who don’t fight”, in the hope girls and women will get on board to influence young men not to respond violently in heated situations.

“We want the community to get behind this campaign, to stop the violence that is ruining young lives.”
Commissioner Bob Atkinson said this message will go hand in hand with the Party Safe message.
“We want all young people to have a good start in life, and acts of violence can ruin both victim’s and offender’s chances of a positive future.
“This campaign is a positive way to change the attitudes of those young people who are involved in violence, by communicating with them in ways they will notice.
“I encourage all Queenslanders to get behind this message, and all people who are hosting parties to register with police.”
Paul Stanley and the Matthew Stanley Foundation play a big role in promoting the anti-violence message and Party Safe Initiative.
“I’m wrapped to see the government following through on their commitment to deliver this campaign,” Mr Stanley said.
“We must get the message across to young people that violence is not ok – and to do so we need to initiate cultural change now, for the future.”
The Queensland Homicide Victims Support Group has also played a big role in promoting the One Punch Can Kill Message.
Chief Executive Officers of the group, Jonty Bush said: “This is a worthwhile investment by the Queensland Government in promoting the potential consequences of violent behaviour and is something that our organisation has actively been promoting”.
“The Queensland Homicide Victims Support Group continues to witness the tragic aftermath of violence, and believes that education revealing that one punch can kill is crucial.”

Phase two is currently being developed with options being considered including:
further internet promotion and design of a website which would include an online game;
outdoor education through bus backs and outdoor displays using inflatable to promote the key messages
targeting young people in places where they frequent, such music festivals etc. 

11 December, 2007

Further inquiries: Premiers Office (07) 3224 4500

http://statements.cabinet.qld.gov.au/MMS/StatementDisplaySingle.aspx?id=55756 (one punch can kill release)